Five of the Best Places to Teach English Abroad in 2015

Five of the Best Places to Teach English Abroad in 2015

Feeling restless at work or in your day-to-day life?

Perhaps you’re a recent college grad who isn’t quite sure what the next step is?

Do you dream of losing track of time in an exotic locale and immersing yourself in a foreign culture? Do you want to feel like you actually make a difference when you show up to work every day?

If that sounds like you, then maybe you should be thinking about teaching English Abroad.

No matter what your situation is, it’s never too late for change!  So with that being said, let’s take a look at some of the best places to live and work as an EFL teacher in 2015.

Want To Get Started?

TESOL 101 - Intro to Teaching Abroad

 

1. Vietnam

Teach English in Vietnam

Along with much of Southeast Asia, Vietnam has been experiencing a boom in tourism over the past several years.  Add to that Vietnam’s ever-increasing economic importance, and demand for EFL teachers has never been stronger in the region.  Teachers are always a sought after commodity in Ho Chi Minh City, but secondary markets like Da Nang (The #1 Emerging Travel Destination of 2015 according to TripAdvisor) are popping up throughout the country too, presenting teachers with a wide variety of prospects in both urban and rural communities.  Salaries are high compared to the cost of living, so you can comfortably cover expenses while still saving a significant chunk of your paycheck every month, which makes it easy to travel throughout the rest of Southeast Asia while teaching in Vietnam.

Continue reading

Posted in Teach English Abroad | 2 Comments

Reflections on Teaching English in Bangkok

Reflections on living and teaching in Bangkok

by Kaytia King

Teaching English in Bangkok

 

When I had the time to truly reflect on my experience teaching in Thailand, I felt, above all things, confused. Yes, I was a teacher, but the fact is, we are all students. Always. We never stop learning and Thailand never stopped teaching me; even when I asked really dumb questions. It comes down to this. Bangkok is the most beautiful and serene, yet calamitous place I have ever known. There will never be anything quite like it. People ask me all the time what was it like living in Thailand. First, I tell them of the variety Thailand offers and how different the North and the South are from one another. Then instead of giving them a list of adjectives that can never tackle the enormity of the question, I describe to them a scene I witnessed that in my mind is truly Bangkok.

Continue reading

Posted in Teach English in Thailand | Tagged , | Leave a comment

5 Thanksgiving Traditions Around the World

Thanksgiving is approaching, and here in the US, most people are already well into the process of making travel arrangements and concocting plans to eat copious amounts of food with friends and family.  However, the holiday season has also the potential to be difficult for people that are celebrating far from home, including LanguageCorps participants currently teaching English abroad.  But just because you’re away from home this year doesn’t mean that you can’t still celebrate the Thanksgiving season.

Of course in the US, we have our own idea of what Thanksgiving means, but most cultures throughout the world have their own fall/harvest celebrations, and many of them have been around much longer than the American Thanksgiving tradition.  When Abraham Lincoln established Thanksgiving as a national holiday, commemorating early American settlers and the Native Americans that came before them, he was really just cementing the tradition of giving thanks for a bountiful harvest that had existed in many cultures for centuries.

So, we thought that this would be a good time to take a look at some different “Thanksgiving” traditions and celebrations around the world.  If you’re spending this year abroad, perhaps you can find a way to incorporate some of these ideas into your own local celebration.  Instead of feeling homesick, create your own tradition and bring the party to your new home.  Because wherever you are, I guarantee you, there is plenty to be Thankful for!

1. China: “Chung Chiu” Moon Festival

Similar to the US holiday, the annual “Moon Festival” in China is a time to gather with families and loved ones, and give thanks for a successful harvest and plentiful nourishment.  The festival typically falls on the 15th day of September or October, when the moon is said to be at it’s brightest.  Thus, one of the customs marking the festival is mooncake, a flaky pastry with creamy filling.

mooncake

Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ruocaled/8046402099/

2: Vietnam: Têt-Trung-Thu Festival

The Têt-Trung-Thu Festival in Vietnam also typically takes place on the 15th day of September or October, and is sometimes referred to as the “mid-autumn” festival or the “lantern festival.”  The festival is marked by gathering with friends and families to give thanks for blessings, and is also a time when families pray for success in the upcoming year (pregnancies and marriages especially.)  Lanterns and masks are also an important part of the festival, with towns and cities often displaying hundreds of paper lanterns of various colors, shapes and sizes while parades of costumed children and adults wind through the streets.

Têt-Trung-Thu

Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/b1nhb00ng/407928410/

3. United Kingdom: Harvest Festival

In the UK, people give thanks for the year’s harvest on the full moon closest to the autumn equinox, usually occurring late Sep or early Oct.  Like the US festival, it’s a time to feast with family and friends and enjoy a break from the day-to-day work grind.  Marked by singing, hymns, and decorating local churches with fruit baskets or food, this celebration has been taking place in some form since Pagan times.

Harvest Festival

Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/anemoneprojectors/10491679693/

4. Brazil: Day of Thanksgivings

Inspired by an ambassador’s trip to the states in 1949, the Brazilian tradition was officially renamed “Dia de Ao de Graas”, or day of thanks giving.  Brazilian Thanksgiving also takes place on the fourth Thursday of November, and is marked by a turkey feast and a Mass at Church.  Carnivals and parades are also common!

Brazil

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jonycunha/

5. Korea: Chuseok

Taking place on the 15th day of the 8th month of the lunar calendar, Chuseok is a major harvest festival that earns Koreans a 3 day holiday.  Families gather and celebrate with traditional Korean food like Japchae, bulgogi and songpyeon, and perform traditional rituals to remember loved ones that have passed.  Visiting tombs and memorial sites of family members is also common, where surviving relatives will make offerings of food, drink and crops.

Chuseok

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rowan_peter/

Posted in Travel, Travel Tips | Leave a comment

Moving Abroad: Get Your Finances in Order

You are about to embark on a life-altering journey teaching English abroad. There is no “right” way to leave your life behind and start fresh in a new country. But if you get a few of the important things, like finances, sorted out up front, everything else will fall into place. Here are some essentials to cover before you take off:

Automate Finances at Home

Moving Abroad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sure, you’ve got your apartment subletted and you sold your car on Craigslist, but between student loans, credit cards, insurance and other miscellaneous bills, you’ve still got financial responsibilities back in the States. Instead of relying on your usual Google Calendar reminders to pay your bills on time, set up auto pay on all of the accounts that offer it. It’s going to be challenging enough to get adjusted to the new time zone without having to do business in your home time zone to pay everything on time. If the individual companies don’t offer an auto pay service, see if your bank does or switch to one that does before your departure to streamline your financial responsibilities while away.

Have an Emergency Plan

From medical issues to robbery and identity theft, no matter where you are in the world, sometimes unexpected challenging circumstances arise. Do you know how you would handle this type of emergency? Do you have identity theft protection? Do you have access to some quick cash or know where to get money wired to you at your destination? If you need to replace stolen bank cards or your passport, do you know where you could do that? Always have a contingency plan in place for any worst-case scenarios to ensure you’re prepared for whatever life throws at you.

Avoid High Banking Fees

When traveling abroad, many people do all they can to avoid high foreign transaction fees. This becomes even more essential if you’re living abroad. Find out the foreign transaction fees (if any) from your current banks and credit card companies. If your financial institutions charge foreign transaction fees, then sign up for another card that doesn’t and do your best to only use that card while living abroad. Do your research before signing up for another credit card so that you can find something with maximum benefits, like earning points that can be used for air travel or hotel stays for weekend trips exploring this new area of the world. ThePointsGuy.com is a valuable resource to help determine the best card for your needs, as he has built an entire brand around how to maximize credit card points to travel the world.

Posted in Teach English Abroad | Leave a comment

54 Years Old and Loving Teaching Abroad

54 years old and loving teaching abroad

“Is teaching abroad just for recent college grads and young people?”

It’s a common question we receive at LanguageCorps, but the short answer is no, teaching abroad is not just for “young” people.

Age restrictions vary by location, and many of our teachers ARE in their 20s or 30s, but we’ve also had people in their 60s and beyond participate in our programs.  If you are enthusiastic and young at heart, in many countries, the only limits are those that you place upon yourself!

Today’s alumni interview with Pat in Turkey is a prime example of just that.  Pat began his adventure teaching English abroad at the young age of 54, and it has been awesome hearing about his experience!  Check out Pat’s story below:

Continue reading

Posted in Teaching English Abroad, Travel | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

LanguageCorps November Discount – Teach English in Asia!  

What are you thankful for this Thanksgiving?  

At LanguageCorps, we’re thankful for travel!  It’s been another great year of helping people teach English in Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East, and to celebrate, we’re offering a limited-time discount on our TESOL Certification Courses in Southeast Asia.

For our programs in Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia starting between November 10, 2014 and June 15, 2015, we are offering $200 off the program fee for people that enroll during the month of November. It’s that easy!

If you’re thinking about teaching English in Asia, there’s no better time to start than now.  You’ll get to live in a fascinating location and explore some of the most unique destinations in the world, all while making a profound difference in the lives of your students, supporting the community around you, AND earning money as a paid English teacher.

This offer is valid for deposits received during the month of November 2014, for LangaugeCorps Southeast Asia programs starting between November 10, 2014 and June 15, 2015(does not include China or Taiwan programs).

For more information on LanguageCorps TESOL Certification Programs in Southeast Asia, please see http://www.languagecorps.com/teach-english-asia/.

www.languagecorps.com
info@languagecorps.com
978 562 2100

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Things to Consider Before you Teach English in Thailand

By Kat Apelian

When I chose to teach English in Thailand at the end of 2012, I had very little idea what I was jumping into. Like most, I had never been to Asia, and no place was further away from my hometown.

But what I did have was a lot of was city experience.

Lighting storm in Bangkok

 

 

Continue reading

Posted in Teach English in Thailand, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Alumni Interview: Teaching English in Europe with Allison

Continuing with the theme of teaching English in Europe, today we are happy to share an alumni interview with Allison.  Allison is currently living out her dream of living and working in Spain, and teaching abroad was her means of accomplishing that goal.  At the time of this interview Allison was living just outside of Barcelona, teaching English to young children and organizing private sessions on the side.  Great to hear from a participant that is making the most of her experience and loving life in Spain!  And in case you missed it, don’t forget to check out our last alumni interview with Taylor in Florence.

Barcelona At Night

Continue reading

Posted in Teach English in Europe | Leave a comment

Leaving It All to Teach English in Spain

Leaving It All to Teach English in Spain

by Lauren Hartley

I never imagined that I would leave home to teach English in Spain, but my desire to live abroad began after my friend and I visited Europe together for the first time in 2007. Between the summers of 2007 and 2008, we’d traveled to more than 10 European countries, the last of which was Spain. I loved every country we visited, but Spain was the place that I loved the most with its sunny weather, beautiful beaches and palm trees (something we don’t get in Ohio!), and the perfect place to improve my Spanish. I told myself from that moment that I would return to live in Spain after graduating college.

Paris

Continue reading

Posted in Teach English in Spain | Leave a comment

The 2014 LanguageCorps Media Contest

The time has come to announce the 2014 LangaugeCorps Media Contest!  

If you previously participated in a LanguageCorps Program (TESOL Certification, TESOL Plus, Flagship, TeachChina, TeachTaiwan, Volunteer or Online TEFL), or are currently participating, then you are eligible to submit (just please don’t reuse work from previous contests).  We have a couple different categories this year to switch things up, so check out the details below and send us your best stuff. You could win some cash and have your work featured on our networks across the web!

2014 LANGUAGECORPS MEDIA CONTEST

1) Video Testimonial

Submit a short (under one minute) video about your LangaugeCorps experience, and how teaching abroad has changed your life.

First Prize: $200

Runner Up: $100

2) Photo Contest

Submit your best photos from your time teaching abroad.  Get creative!

First Prize: $150

Runner Up: $75

3) Writing Contest

Submit 500-1000 words about how teaching English abroad has changed your life.

First Prize: $100

Entries must be received by November 30th, 2014.  Winners will be announced by December 15th, 2014.  

We have a blast reviewing your submissions every year, and we’re excited to see what you come up with this time around!  Please share this email with any teachers who might not see it, and let us know if you have any questions.

(LanguageCorps reserves the right to link to any/all videos and albums submitted for consideration, to use the content for marketing purposes, and to limit prize distributions if the quality and/or volume of submissions is lower than anticipated.)

Feel free to check out last year’s winners for some inspiration!

PLEASE EMAIL SUBMISSIONS (ORIGINAL FILES OR HIGH QUALITY LINKS) TO STEVE.PATTON@LANGUAGECORPS.COM.

Good luck!

Posted in Teach English Abroad | Leave a comment